Student publication meeting draws students with interest in covering campus life

After a slow first year, the Johnson University Royal Scribe is beginning a new chapter with a new staff.

Students check out the Royal Scribe Website as they learn about reporting for the Johnson student Publication.
Students check out the Royal Scribe Website as they learn about reporting for the Johnson student publication.

Eleven students met Thursday to learn more about working for the Royal Scribe, Johnson University’s student publication.

“The Scribe is an opportunity for students to participate in campus life and take part in Johnson’s history,” said Matthew Broaddus, advisor to the Royal Scribe. “It is also an opportunity for students to practice gathering and reporting information.”

The Scribe staff will be covering events on campus and of interest to the students, staff and faculty at Johnson University.
Perspective staff members were introduced to Johnson freshman journalism major Abbey Whitaker, who will be serving as the Scribe’s Editor-N-Chief.

Whitaker told the students she was exited to see so many participants.

“Being on the Scribe will help you in so many more ways than you can imagine,” she said.

Broaddus agreed that a student publication is an important part of campus life.

“Faculty members who have been here for many years have told me this is one of the least documented periods in Johnson’s history,” he said. “We want to make sure that isn’t the case.”

Read moreStudent publication meeting draws students with interest in covering campus life

A quick word to the public from the new Editor-N-Chief

An Indiana corn field caught in the midst of daylight.
An Indiana corn field caught in the midst of daylight.

Greetings, Johnson University! Abbey Whitaker is the name. I will firstly introduce myself as another Johnson freshman from the state of Indiana, and secondly as the excited new Editor-N-Chief of the Royal Scribe. Yes, I reign from a small country town in Indiana, but my dreams and ambitions were never limited to the compact borders my town held.

Growing up in Indiana, I was always surrounded by corn fields on my left and right. I took every chance I could to escape to somewhere more magical, like somewhere with mountains or an ocean. Being encompassed by flat land, the mountains had always caught my eye. Luckily, Johnson is full of those.

I did not choose Johnson for that reason alone, however. I have been visiting Johnson University ever since I was a little girl. My preacher’s wife at my home church went to Johnson when it was still “Johnson Bible College.” That was my first hook. Later in my high school career, both my youth minister’s went to Johnson and graduated in 2001. That was my second hook. By this point, I already had my eye on Johnson, but there was still one more thing missing.

Read moreA quick word to the public from the new Editor-N-Chief

Johnson seniors reflect on college experience

As classes begin and Freshmen commence their journey at Johnson University, Seniors look back on an experience that has molded and shaped them in preparation for ministry to the real world. They have gained confidence in themselves and developed meaningful relationships with their peers, while growing in Christ and developing strategic methods for spreading his … Read moreJohnson seniors reflect on college experience

First career fair for Johnson University campus

Johnson University’s Tennessee campus held its first career fairs this past Friday. The event took place from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. and hosted up to 31 different organizations. These organizations ranged from being locally based or in the greater Knoxville area to stateside and abroad. These companies varied in their appearance and purpose, some of which were fellow universities with extensive graduate school programs. The event had been organized and planed by the Career Services Office and the Department of Student life. The Office was designed to help students through various activities find the right career path. Kara Smith, a senior studying in the counseling program, attended the fair and gave her input about the event.

Students react to new form of social media

A new form of social media has become a controversial topic at Johnson University. Yik Yak, an app for smartphones, which allows members to post anything they want anonymously, has begun a rift in opinions of the students and staff of the University. While some think it is a fun way to express their selves, others have deemed it a new way to bully, bash and speak unkindly about fellow classmates.

Retreats and Ethics: A closer look at how the senior capstone class works, and what the students learn in it

As many college students go through their senior year, many new things start to happen that do not typically happen in the years preceding it. As seniors in college approach graduation, they face a variety of new experiences and changes. Graduation becomes a more frequent topic that pervades thought and conversation, post-graduation housing plans are … Read moreRetreats and Ethics: A closer look at how the senior capstone class works, and what the students learn in it

Students carry chains to raise awareness

Members of the International Justice Mission Chapter at Johnson University plan to host an event again this year called Day of Chains. The event is meant to spread awareness of the growing issue of modern day slavery in all of its forms. Students both run the operation and participate by carrying real and rather large chains around a path to pray for the enslaved around the world.