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Bottle of water opens door to salvation

Sitting in the room in which he once detoxed, Samuel smiles and said, “Its only because of God that I am here today.”

Stephanie Mitchem, the director of Water Angels, said the first time she met Samuel he told her, “I tried that Jesus character once. He did nothing for me.”

Samuel Burgin is a current student at Johnson University who struggled with homelessness and drug addiction.

“Water Angels has the power to change lives,” he said. It changed mine and without it I don’t want to think where I would be.”

Mitchem is the founder and current director of Water Angels ministry and has witnessed the change Christ has made in Samuel’s life first hand.

“The best thing about this ministry is getting to see God work, to see life change right there in front of you and even if this ministry was only for Samuel, it would be worth it,” She said.

Stephanie met Samuel one day under the bridge , the usual homeless hangout in downtown Knoxville. When Stephanie first met Samuel and asked if she could pray for him he said no. Samuel at that time, was only under the bridge to buy drugs in between buses from Atlanta to North Carolina, where he is from.

“Its amazing to see how God works, His timing is flawless,” Stephanie said.

“We exchanged emails and I continued to pray for him. In one of those emails I had told him about the rehabilitation house we have here at Water Angels,” she said. “I wanted to let him know that if he ever wanted to find out who Christ is that he always has a place here.”

Sure enough, Samuel responded and wanted to give up drugs to find Christ.

“This room we’re in was once my home,” Samuel said. “It had four of us packed into this little area.”

“The first thing I did when I got clean was tell Stephanie that a change is needed here,” He said.

Samuel professed Christ as his personal Lord and savior shortly after his move into the house and was baptized in the mountains not to long after.

“Samuel immediately dove into scripture. I mean really, unlike I have ever seen,” Stephanie said. “He loves to study and the change in his life was noticeable immediately.”

While at Water angels, Samuel worked well with the kids in the 180 Gang, a gang for troubled youth who are either homeless or at risk in the Knoxville area.

Stephanie noticed this and recommended to Samuel that he think about becoming a youth minister.

After Samuel applied to Johnson University, Stephanie had her doubts.

“I thought to myself, there is just no way, I mean he got his GED in prison, there is just no way he will get in,” she said.

But Samuel was soon accepted to the school.

“After four nerve racking months, I got an email with the subject line ‘Congratulations!’, and I just could not believe it.” Samuel said.

“I was surprised that he got in, but then the issue became how is he going to pay for this?” Stephanie said.

Samuel never lost faith.

“I had to encourage Stephanie, I told her that if this truly is God’s will, He will provide a way for me to finance this tuition,” Samuel said.

Before starting the Fall semester, Samuel had obtained more than $14,000 in scholarships.

“Sure enough, he’s there,” Stephanie said. “ He is hoping to get into student ministry and he still comes to Water Angels on Sundays to volunteer here for our kids.”

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Johnson University unleashes day of service across Knoxville

Students show selflessness in community outreach.

Every year the Johnson University student body participates in a campus wide event known as K-day. This year hundreds of the students fanned out across the Knoxville area to help various organizations. The students and faculty involved performed various tasks and worked to make the university a presence in the Knoxville community.

The Johnson University student body participated in a service event to aid many organizations in a community outreach Sept. 17.

K-14 carries on a tradition started by the students in the Student Government Association (SGA),  in response to the National Service Day created after the terrorist attacks of 9/11. The event was designed to reach people in the local community and to give a helping hand to ministries in the area.

According to Carrie Overdorf, the Service Learning Coordinator at Johnson University, the initial reaction to the event was a positive one with a growing number of organizations wishing to participate with the University.

“We really do want to impact the community”, Overdorf said. “The university wishes to be a presence in the community to share the love of Christ where we have the chance, but mostly to help those organizations that need extra help.”

The students traveled all across the greater Knoxville area to aid more than thirty organizations that had wished to participate in the event. “This year hopefully we’ll get more faculty involved,” Overdorf said.

In previous years no faculty had been present on sight to work with the students. Overdorf said that there was a difficulty this year with accommodating all the students, as the university itself has experienced an influx of students.

“There was a possibility of moving the service day to another time of year, to help free up time for those involved because the fall can be a busy time for both students and faculty,” Overdorf said.

“We provide quality work,” she said. “We are dependable and we are doing it because we love what they (organizations) are doing and are invested in it as well.”

Students often continue to volunteer with the organizations they serve on K-day throughout the year. The event opens gateways for students to become involved with the community and learn testimonies of the people they serve.

Chrissi Newbold, a student who participated in K-14, served at Live It, a non-profit working to bring the Bible to people everywhere.

“It’s actually a really cool organization,” she said. “It started out as a group of people who went and did huge service projects kind of like things we are doing for K-14, but they would do it for widows and orphans and the public.”

“It’s really nice to be able give back to them”.

This day of helping others will continue in the coming year with K-15 being the new title of the event with hopes of even more students and faculty helping the community of Knoxville.

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Students connect with refugees during summer

For a couple months during this summer, two Johnson University students spent time working with refugees in Houston.

Christina Crutchfield, 23, and Liz Carson, 20, participated in internships through the parent organization Global Frontier Missions, teaching English as a second language and loving on the families present in the program.

The local Mission Organization (whose name is being withheld for security purposes) is an outreach program that teaches English to non-native speakers. The organization houses refugees, many of which are specifically selected for the program.

Crutchfield and Carson said that roughly 1 percent of the refugee population actually makes it to America.

“We also learned about the plight of the refugee,” Crutchfield said. “A lot of them come from a warzone due to unrest or fighting because of religion. We got to see real people behind the stories you’d see on TV.”

Crutchfield said that many are not Christians and proceeded to explain how they were able to overcome the obstacle of differing religions.

“We found what we called bridges between the religions, like Islam says there is one God and we believe in one God as well,” Crutchfield said.

Carson said that it was her second time with the internship and that learning about these cultures is a blessing.

“When it comes to the religion aspect we spent every Sunday going to mosques and Buddhist temples and Hindu temples more than we were in churches.” Carson said. “We also realized how they function as people and finding out what was missing to try and help and connect them to other people.”

She said there is a need for many of the refugees to make friends here in the United States, as many of them did not have any connections with people in the U.S.

Carson said the refugees have a chance to become Citizens as their test results are expedited.

“We actually worked with a family who explained all the differences of coming to the United States,” Crutchfield said. “I asked them what was the hardest to adjust to and they answered with people just don’t have time for you here.”

Both confirmed that given the chance they would return to work for the organization again.  

“It was incredible to put faces with the stories” Carson said. “It was such a blessing to get to know them.”

Both women said that they would even recommend it to anyone interested in getting a taste of what the refugee plight actually is, and anyone with a passion for hurting or repressed people should give thought into being an intern for the organization.

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Royals seen playing around (a game of golf)

Similar to the newness of the morning dew on a freshly cut putting green, Johnson University has started a golf team that widens the fairway of the athletic program.

More than 20 undergraduate students have expressed interest in starting a golf team, a lot more than was expected, said Ken Underwood, Johnson University’s Athletic Director and Men’s Soccer Coach.

“The unexpected amount of interest from students along with support from the Administration and Trustees was the determining factor for starting the golf team,” Underwood said.

Spenser Proctor, a 2012 graduate of JU, was asked to be the team’s new head coach, due to what Underwood described as his “institutional fit and desire to serve”.

“I had spoken to Ken about the possibility of helping with the golf team for quite a while before it became a reality,” Procter said.  “When I was a student here, there was always talks of getting together to play but there never really was enough interest to have an official team.”

There was so much interest that Proctor is having to look at holding tryouts.

“Now we can only keep eight players,” he said. “Although everyone who showed interest has not tried out we will have to cut two players for this semester.”

Kalab Smith, a Johnson University Sophomore, and potential golf team member, is optimistic for the team.

“When I originally applied for Johnson my intention was not athletics, but I had always wanted to be a college athlete,” he said. “I was discouraged when I found out that Johnson doesn’t have a golf team but I’m so pumped that I may finally be a college athlete.”

Students are excited to represent their faith as a part of the team.

“I feel like golf is a sport that I can play and give glory to God while I’m playing,” said Kenneth Lane, a potential golf team member. “Win or lose, we are going to be a team, we are just some normal guys enjoying a hobby together.”

The team members are also excited to grow along side one another. Grow as leaders, brothers and epically as Christians.

“It’s an awesome opportunity to grow in your game and grow in your spiritual life, I would recommend joining to anyone,” said Smith.

Johnson University’s Athletic department made funds available to have an organized golf team as part of the athletic program. Many undergraduate students have shown interest.

Officials at Johnson University have established an arrangement with Creekside Plantation golf course in Seymour, Tn. The arrangement allows the golf team to play three rounds of 18 holes for practice three times a week and unlimited rage balls for all members of the team.

“I hope to build a foundation of excellence as we all learn together what it looks like to run a successful golf program.” Proctor said. “As we take baby steps into that success we will compete a few times each semester and set high standards along the way. Most importantly, we will set out to grow each man involved in the team into a man of God.”

https://www.youtube.com/watchv=WMtNy1BHUO8&list=UUr5BMWnCJ7HGFanZcQa_bgA

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Kimberlin Heights Postmaster reflects as he preparers for retirement

Buster Smith always has gum and candy unhand to offer his patrons. (Photo by Spencer McGuire)

Buster Smith always has gum and candy onhand to offer his patrons. (Photo by Spencer McGuire)

Just like Gap Creek Elementary School and Johnson University, the Post office of

Kimberlin Heights has been part of the community for many years. But, despite the long history of the post office, it will soon close its door forever.

The last Postmaster to serve the community is Buster Smith, 88, who took the position in 1988. He did so after his wife, the previous post master, passed away that same year.

“I started really in 87 just working in here letting some else do all the other book work,” Smith said. “Then she passed away, and I had to do it all, so really 88 was when I really started work.”

During his time at the post office, Smith has had many opportunities to serve the faculty and students of Johnson University. Both have become very fond of Smith.

“…I was going over to buy some stamps… I encountered Buster,” said Matthew Shears, a junior at Johnson. “…He was very friendly.”

“He offered me gum, we chatted for a little bit, talked about Kimberlin Heights, and how he had been here for so long. It was a neat experience to get to talk to Buster.”

Smith shares a fondness of the students in turn.

“…Students come in here about everyday… they’re really good. I don’t have a thing to say against them at all,” Smith said.

Even though Smith has enjoyed his time as Postmaster, he has still had to deal with the many problems that every post office worker has encountered, paperwork being one he will not miss.

“ Whenever I was making out my 14/12…sending in all the money… a dollar had stuck together I reckon… The lady down at Wisegarber post office called and said ‘Buster you’re over a dollar…’ I said ‘just put it in your pocket, and I put one out over here to make it even,’ and she said ‘…I can’t do it that way,’” said Smith. “’So she told me to get my 14/12 out and she’d tell me everything to put down… and then she said ‘tomorrow I’ll fix it.’”

But regardless of these challenges, Smith has still enjoyed his time as Postmaster. He will miss working and talking to his customers.

“There’s a lot of them over there (at Johnson University) that told me they’d miss me,” he said. “I’ll miss them too, but it just can’t be helped. I’ll miss them.”

As for Smith’s plan for his retirement he said that he does not have anything special planned.

“I haven’t got no plan or nothing, but mowing the yard. I got nothing in mind yet,” he said.

Regardless of how Smith will spend his retirement, those who know him will miss him.

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Welcome to Royal Scribe

Abbey Whitaker

Abbey Whitaker is the Editor N Chief of the Royal Scribe.

Welcome to Royal Scribe, the student publication for students at Johnson University.

Royal Scribe is a student-run publication, which is housed and advised through the School of Communication and Creative Arts. Any Johnson student is welcome to participate in this student publication.

Johnson University freshman Abbey Whitaker is serving  as the editor-n-chief for Royal Scribe. To get involved or submit a story idea e-mail Whitaker at royal scribe@johnsonu.edu.

Royal Scribe is dedicated to delivering news and information of interest to  Johnson University students, alumni and friends, as well as to the Kimberlin Heights community.

The content is student produced and does not necessarily reflect the views of the administration of Johnson University.

Royal Scribe is a vehicle for students to practice journalism. The nature of mass media requires our lab to be in the public purview. Such a level of scrutiny demands that students practice the highest level of journalistic ethics and professionalism.

As Christians, we are called to an even higher level of excellence. Royal Scribe provides students with a vehicle to hone these abilities.

Check Royal Scribe for updates on campus activities, mission activities, sports reports, campus life, student and faculty features and other news of interest to Johnson University.

Thanks for reading,

Dr. Matthew Broaddus

Faculty Advisor to the Royal Scribe